Today in White Sox History

Today in White Sox History: September 2

Buck Weaver, Lou Berger and Mike Kreevich rap out big hits, Roland rolls into town, and Tim Raines is cut down.

Best day ever: Buck Weaver could hardly make an out, 101 years ago today. (Wikipedia)


Sept. 2, 1918 — In a season-ending (the 1918 season ended early because of World War I) doubleheader at Detroit, George “Buck” Weaver rapped out eight hits in 10 at-bats. The Sox would lose to the Tigers, 11-5 and 7-3. Weaver went 5-for-5 in the first game and 3-for-5 in the nightcap.


Sept. 2, 1937 — In a game at Comiskey Park, Sox third baseman LouBoze” Berger and outfielder Mike Kreevich led off the bottom of the first with back-to-back home runs. It was the first time that ever happened in team history. The Sox beat the Boston Red Sox, 4-2.


Sept. 2, 1970 — One of the key dates in franchise history marks Roland Hemond being hired as player personnel director to rebuild the White Sox. The club would go on to lose a team-record 106 games in 1970. The very next year, the South Siders improved by 23 games, from 56 to 79 wins, and by 1972 would be a legitimate title contender. Hemond would eventually become GM, staying with the team through 1985. Hemond brought along, as new field manager, Chuck Tanner. Tanner would be named Manager of the Year in 1972.


Sept. 2, 1995Tim Raines had his American League record of 40 consecutive steals snapped when he was thrown out in the third inning. Toronto’s Randy Knorr was the catcher who ended the streak, during the 10-4 White Sox win over the Blue Jays.

2 comments

  1. 1970 was such a bleak year. My brother being a Cub fan and older than me by 5 years, laughed at me about former Cub outfielder Tanner being named the Sox manager. But he brought the Sox a winning record in 1972 and generally speaking did a fine job, as did Hemond.

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    1. They both did especially considering the financial issues John Allyn got into by 1974. He literally almost went bankrupt which is why he had to sell the team, when his outside business interest went bad.

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