Today in White Sox History: September 14

Rubber arm: “15 innings of work, skip? No problem!”

Sept. 14, 1952 — In a 17-inning game in Chicago, White Sox pitcher Saul Rogovin struck out 14 Boston Red Sox in 15 innings of work. But it was Luis Aloma who got the decision as the White Sox won, 4-3.


Sept. 14, 1974 — White Sox first baseman Dick Allen called a team meeting and announced he was retiring from baseball. Allen, the controversial slugger, would win the American League home run title despite missing the final two weeks of the season. Allen was fighting serious injuries to his shoulder and leg from previous seasons, but the way he “walked out” on the Sox left a bad taste in the mouths of many fans. White Sox GM Roland Hemond traded Allen’s rights to the Atlanta Braves for a player to be named later (interestingly, only after Allen had been traded a second time, to Philadelphia in May 1975, did the White Sox-Braves trade get completed … with one of the players Atlanta acquired from the Phillies, catcher Jim Essian!). Allen would un-retire and see action with the Phillies and Oakland A’s before retiring for good after the 1977 season.


Sept. 14, 1997 — Carlton Fisk had his uniform No. 72 retired in a ceremony before the White Sox took on Cleveland. The game was also remembered for manager Terry Bevington going to the mound to make a pitching change … with no one was warming up in the bullpen when he called for the change! (The White Sox had a 3-0 lead at the time, and Bevington’s blunder of pulling a pitcher with a cold bullpen led Cleveland rallying to win, 8-3.)


Sept. 14, 2017 — It was a record-setting afternoon for a couple of White Sox players in the team’s 17-7 blowout of the Detroit Tigers at Comerica Park. Sox outfielder Avisaíl García went 5-for-5 with seven RBIs and two runs scored in the game, in addition to a walk. White Sox rookie second baseman Yoán Moncada went 4-for-5 with two walks and five runs scored, and first baseman José Abreu went 4-for-5 with three runs scored.

García became the second White Sox player with five hits and seven RBI in a game since at least 1913. The other was Carl Reynolds, at the New York Yankees on July 2, 1930. Moncada, meanwhile, tied Hall-of-Famer Tim Raines‘s franchise record with the five runs scored. Raines originally set the record against the Red Sox in Boston on April 18, 1994.

The Sox as a team pounded out 25 hits in the game.


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WilburWoodWasTheMAN
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WilburWoodWasTheMAN
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Wow. Saul was an interesting Dude. According to Wikipedia, he went to community college and finished university with a degree in literature and became a New York City public school teacher at age 56!

Jorge was intimidated
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Dick left the Sox due to nagging injuries that needed more time to heal and was unhappy on account of Santo destroying the team’s dynamic and Orta’s confidence in his abilities, amongst other slights…Perhaps he did not want to see another “Big Donkey” situation develop as well.

dickschr
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I was listening to the game in question and recall Bob Elson saying several times “Man what a man that Rogovan.”
Also, Saul suffered from narcolepsy but because it wasn’t a commonly diagnosed ailment at the time, he was mocked by sportswriters for falling asleep in the bullpen.

Mark Liptak
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Sox manager Paul Richards didn’t only turn around guys like Nellie Fox, he also taught Rogovin a “slip” pitch like a palm ball which helped turn his career around.