Today in White Sox History: October 2

Doused: The White Sox took the good fortune of a possible 2-0 World Series lead and left it all wet in a late barrage of homers.


1904Doc White’s streak of 45 consecutive scoreless innings was broken when the New York Highlanders (Yankees) got a run in the first inning of the opener of a twinbill in Chicago. White would pitch in both games, getting decisions in both. He won the first game, lost the second.

1908 — In the heat of a three-team pennant race, it may have been the greatest game even thrown by opposing hurlers against one other. Cleveland beat the White Sox, 1-0, as Addie Joss fired a perfect game. Meanwhile White Sox starter Ed Walsh struck out 15 Indians and allowed only three hits. The winning run scored when catcher Ossee Schreck couldn’t hang on to one of Walsh’s spitters with a man on third.


1959 — Game 2 of the World Series started put like a repeat of Game 1. The White Sox were leading the Dodgers, 2-1, in the seventh inning with two out when Chuck Essegian and Charlie Neal slugged home runs off of Bob Shaw. Making matters worse was that in the middle of an eighth-inning Sox rally, the slowest man in baseball, Sherm Lollar, was waved home with what would have been the tying run on a double by Al Smith. Lollar was out by 10 feet. Instead of having men on second and third with no out, it was a runner on third with one out. The Sox lost the game, 4-3.

In the fifth inning, Chicago left fielder Smith would get hit in the face with a cup of beer knocked over by a fan reaching for Neal’s first home run. It would become one of the most famous photographs of the 1950s.


2015 — White Sox starter Chris Sale broke Ed Walsh’s club record for most strikeouts in a season. Sale struck out Tiger James McCann in the second inning of a 2-1 win, giving Sale his 270th strikeout of the year. Walsh’s record had stood since 1908. Sale would finish the 2015 season with 274 strikeouts.

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dickschr
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dickschr
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I was at the 1959 game. The play in question was a hit and run and the third base coach, Tony Cuccinello, waved him on. When asked about the play later he said that he thought Lollar would score because it was a hit and run. The play wasn’t close and Lollar didn’t even attempt to slide. The next batter, Billy Goodman had a chance to tie the game with one out but struck out swinging on a pitch almost over his head. A sad ending to my only World Series game. A more pleasant day was Mother’s Day that… Read more »

WIN05
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WIN05
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That was a stupid answer by Cuccinello. The story I heard was that Lollar held up somewhere around the bases because the left fielder faked him into thinking that he could catch the ball. At any rate, Cuccinello had ample time before Lollar got to third to size up the situation.